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Category — Kid’s nutrition

What’s hiding in your corn?

If you’ve seen the documentary King Corn, or other documentaries about our food supply, you are probably already a little suspicious of corn.  I personally am very allergic to most varieties of corn except for blue, which people think is funny since I lived in Iowa for almost a decade.  I had heard that corn contains mold (similar to the issue with peanuts) but had never taken the time to research it until someone who had gone gluten-free asked me if all the corn in gluten-free foods was worse for you (not to mention more expensive) than just eating gluten.  Great question!  I read through a few studies and then found an absolutely amazing research report on the subject by Charles M. Benbrook, PhD from the Organic Center. Below is what hit me in my own research from several sources but the bulk of the interesting stuff is from Dr. Benbrook’s review.  If you have time, I highly recommend reading the whole report!

  • Worldwide, pretty much all corn grown and then stored (vs. grown and then eaten fresh off the cob) contains mold.  However, the main concern is not the mold itself, but the presence of mycotoxins, which are toxins produced by mold.
  • Wheat, rice, peanuts, spoiled produce (especially apples used in apple juice), and milk and meat (because the animals are fed moldy corn) are also significant contributors of mycotoxins in our daily diets.
  • The key thing in all of this is looking at the type of mycotoxin found in the different foods.  Corn and peanuts contain the highest concentrations of Aflatoxin B, which is considered by many scientists to literally be “the most potent carcinogen known to man” because of its ability to cause intense liver damage and gene mutation.  This makes the mold in corn and peanuts a much higher priority to avoid than the mold in wheat or rice, though they all contain mold.
  • Aflatoxin is extremely stable and lasts for years.  Levels do decline slightly at temperatures above boiling temperatures.
  • The biggest factor in determining the quantity of aflatoxin present in a food is how wet the growing season was when the grain was budding.  So, it’s virtually impossible to trace through the food supply.  Drought stress (like the drought we had last year in the US) also causes an “aflatoxin bloom” when the mold produces more aflatoxin than normal.  So it’s safe to say that we should try to avoid all US grown corn and corn-fed animal products from last year.  Which again, is really hard to trace when you’re shopping at the store!
  • Studies comparing organic vs. commercial levels of aflatoxin in corn and other foods were inconclusive.  Some showed more in organic, some less, some the same, mostly depending on when and where the food was grown.  Monsanto and others have tried to propagate the idea that organic and non-GMO grains are a higher risk for aflatoxin because fungicides are not used.  However, when looking at the food as a whole, a person is much better able to effectively detoxify and prevent harm from aflatoxin exposure when it is not combined in the same mouthful with pesticides, fungicides, and foreign genetics.
  • On a side note, in 2011, 10% of the corn in our food supply was genetically modified.  Sweet corn was the first “vegetable” (because un-sweet corn is a grain, not a vegetable) that Monsanto modified for our food supply.
  • Organic farms also tend to be smaller operations, and they tend to have more “soil harmony” including use of compost tea which inoculates plants with healthier forms of bacteria and non-pathogenic molds that displace molds that produce aflatoxin.
  • Mold also produces higher levels of aflatoxin when exposed to excessive levels of nitrogen, such as those found in commercial fertilizers.
  • I did not find anything saying mold was more or less on blue corn vs. white and yellow.  However, it more likely contains less aflatoxin since it is open pollinated rather than hybridized so would have stronger resistance.
  • Several studies examined mycotoxin content exposure to our children and found that there is a serious concern for kids who eat a lot of wheat – including the wheat cereals for babies which contained some of the highest levels of mycotoxin of ALL foods studied – and for pregnant or nursing mothers who eat bread, breakfast cereals, cake, and liver pate from corn-fed animals (because the aflatoxin the animals are exposed to is concentrated in the liver).  Mycotoxins pass the placental barrier and are more concentrated in human breast milk than in milk from cows.  That’s a hard one for this nursing mother to read without wanting to cry!
  • Stress, disease, hunger, and inadequate protein intake make it more likely that aflatoxins will cause damage in the people eating them.  This makes mold exposure in developing countries a major global issue because some communities have to choose between moldy grain or no grain at all.
  • The USDA is sickeningly lenient when it comes to mycotoxin levels in our food supply.  On all types of mycotoxin (there are about 10 different ones that we keep track of) we have the highest allowed levels of any other nation that is developed enough to monitor this.  We allow 10 times more aflatoxin (the really bad one) than Europe and 2 times more than Japan in corn used for human consumption.  In corn used for animal consumption, we allow 15 times more aflatoxin than Europe and Japan.  For other mycotoxins such as those found in wheat, the US gives “guidelines” for levels but does not necessarily enforce them.

Now, before you turn off your computer and go hide in your closet, I wanted to share some practical points for navigating through this issue.

  • As much as possible, try to have your diet be protein (especially animal protein from grassfed animals or wildcaught seafood, or for vegetarians – minimally processed proteins such as whole raw nuts or dry beans) and fresh produce.  The more a food is processed, the more likely there will be items that contain aflatoxin.
  • When you do need to cook with corn products (as in tasty Mexican food!), try to buy organic or blue corn varieties.
  • If you regularly eat gluten-free pasta, I would suggest using zucchini cut into noodle-shape a mandolin as a first option or use the Andean Dreambrand which is a combo of rice and quinoa flour that cooks well enough that my “texturally particular” (my way of saying picky without imprinting on my son’s brain that he’s picky) toddler loves it.  Any grain will have some mycotoxin, but rice and quinoa tend show lower levels when tested (though rice does have its own issues, I will get into that at some point in the future).
  • Use sourdough as much as possible when having bread.  Lactic acid bacteria such as those found in yogurt and sourdough bind mycotoxins and prevent their absorption.  I recently started making my own kombucha and at some point want to make my own sauerkraut and sourdough bread if I can ever got over the concept that I have to make it the way my dad told me when I was a kid, which is that old miners in California would keep their sourdough starter in their armpits because it was the right temperature.  So from ages 8 to 16 I would not eat sourdough because I thought it all came from armpits.  (And I know the point of writing this blog is not analyzing my own psychology but I have to admit that subconsciously I still kind of think about armpits when I eat sourdough. )
  • Always serve beans (preferable whole black or pinto) or another high soluble fiber vegetable at Mexican meals containing corn.  The fiber in the beans helps to bind the aflatoxin.  As I write this I’m remembering that one of my favorite people in the world back in Iowa always wanted to eat apple sauce on his enchiladas, which seemed crazy but when I tried it, it was delicious!  Maybe he knew that apples are a good source of soluble fiber so they are a perfect complement to the corn in the enchilada :).
  • Eat more beets, which directly support the liver.  I don’t think I personally can practically avoid mycotoxins altogether (they are even in wine!) but I can eat foods that make my liver more able to handle them.  There are so many ways to enjoy beets – raw shredded beets are great in sandwiches, steamed beets taste wonderful in salads, and roasted beets are a delicious side dish.  And if you are new to eating beets, don’t think your kidneys exploded if your urine if pink or red after you eat them.  There is even a ridiculous Wikipedia explanation on the subject.
  • Ingesting bentonite clay is one of the most effective ways to bind aflatoxins in the gut, so much so that some feedlot farmers have considered adding bentonite to their feed to keep their animals from dying of liver cancer before slaughter from the constant exposure to aflatoxin in their feed.  In my private yet public blog confessional, this is the part where I confess that I have started sprinkling bentonite clay over popcorn (alongside the Celtic salt and butter) when my kids and husband eat it (I try to keep the blue corn popcornon hand).  I get the super fine bentonite clay and lightly dust it over the top, mostly to give me some peace of mind that it’s soaking up aflatoxins while they’re watching a movie.  Neurotic I know, but nobody has complained about their popcorn tasting like a face mask yet so don’t tell them :).

 

June 19, 2013   No Comments

The Best Way to Cook Bacon…is in Water???

My blog software has a function that tells me what search terms bring people to my website.  Despite the numerous entries I have written on health, children, pregnancy, and nutrition, the #1 search term that brings people to my site is still “the benefits of bacon”!!!  This tells me that even if I posted the cure for cancer, the answer for world peace, or the quantum formula for staying young forever naturally, you people would all just scroll down until you found more info on bacon.  And that is why I love you.  So, to give the people what they want I thought I should share with you the bizarre discovery that I made last night – the best way to cook bacon is in water!

I buy the natural, nitrate-free bacon in bulk at the Whole Foods butcher counter because it is $8.99/pound versus $8.99/ half-pound shrink-wrapped package in the cooler.  The only downside to this is that the butcher counter bacon is like 3 times thicker than normal bacon which means I either cook it for a ridiculously long time on low heat resulting in a not-burned but rock hard carbonized piece of bacon or I cook it at higher heat for less time which results in partially charred bacon with completely raw fat.  Neither of these options helps my reputation for burning food, which started in college when I set a piece of toast on fire in a friend’s toaster oven and which continues to current day with my toddler staring up at me with his big eyes and furrowed eyebrows while I cook, pointing at the pan and saying repeatedly, “Mommy it’s buh-ning, it’s buh-ning.”  Parenting is hard enough without the commentary, thank you very much!  So last night, planning BLT’s for dinner, I decided to get educated and googled “best way to cook bacon” while nursing my 6-month old (really, what did we do before smart phones?  Figure things out on our own?).  I found this video:

“Super Quick Video Tips: How to Make the Most Perfect Bacon Ever”

If you don’t have time for the 1-minute video or if you’re at work and shouldn’t be reading this blog in the first place let alone watching a video about bacon on company time, here’s the summary:

  • Put bacon in skillet, cover with water (like 1-2″ of water).
  • Heat on high until water boils, then turn down to medium high.
  • Once water has evaporated turn to medium low and keep cooking until bacon is to your liking.

The results were perfect! The bacon was crispy, not burned, and so good that my toddler and I ate almost all of it before my husband came home from work so I had to pretend like grass-fed hamburgers with bacon crumbles (made from the 1 piece of bacon left after our mother-son bacon rampage) were what I was planning for dinner all along.  Poor guy.

September 10, 2012   1 Comment

5 Healthy Last-Minute Gift Ideas

For those of you who have last-minute holiday gifts to take care of, here are a few of my favorites.  They can all be purchased online so you don’t have to fight the crowds.  And if you happen to live on an island in the middle of the Pacific or some other remote place that won’t receive your shipped items before the desired date, you can always cut out a photo of the item and tape it into a card with a note saying it will arrive soon.  Happy holidays!

 

Nothing says “Happy holidays, I’m sorry for being a headache” like the gift of sinus cleansing with a nifty green or blue neti pot.

For the creative, health-conscious chef in your life, a copy of Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. This is my favorite cookbook and even when I’m not cooking I like to read through the informational tidbits in the sidebars of the book.

College students, bachelors, and busy people who tend to eat on the go can all benefit from a basic set of glass storage containers like the ones pictured above by Pyrex.  What seems like a boring gift can be spiced up with the knowledge that you are saving the recipient from countless amounts of exposure to hormone-altering plastic compounds found in most other food storage containers.  So it’s actually an exciting and scandalous gift for their reproductive health – a must-have for every bachelorette party registry!

 

 

 

 

A very creative and healthy gift idea is to buy someone a membership into a CSA (community supported agriculture) program in their area.  Just visit the Local Harvest CSA page and type in the desired zip code to find a nearby CSA.  Most CSA programs function on a weekly or monthly basis and make boxes containing a variety of seasonal produce available to their members.  Depending on the CSA programs available in your area, you can buy a one-week trial membership for $15-20 or a longer membership if desired.  This type of gift is better for someone with some kitchen experience (especially with obscure vegetables).  Weekly boxes of leafy greens, kohlrabi, radishes, and spaghetti squash might be a little overwhelming for the novice cook!

 

For the sparkling water lover in your life, try this soda maker with glass carafe.  It’s a little pricey up front, but in the long run it will save money and space in your recycling bin (I suggest buying this for someone in your house so you can reap the benefits also!).  If you need more reasons to make your own sparkling water at home rather than buying it from a company, just watch the documentary Flow and see the impact bottled water has on the environment, indigenous cultures, and our health.  After I watched that movie I had no choice but to give up my beloved boxes of San Pellegrino water from Costco!

December 20, 2011   No Comments

Finally, a Purpose for Ridiculously Tiny Crockpots!

As a person who can never turn down free kitchen gadgets from friends who are moving or trying to get rid of clutter, I have assembled a collection of those 16 ounce “Little Dipper” crockpots for ants that come free with the normal size crockpots.  Each time I accept another free tiny crockpot, it is wrapped in the original packaging, which means that my friend never used it in all the years they had it in their possession.  Despite this, I get visions in my head of an amazing Mexican-themed dinner party with several flavors of homemade cheese dip being kept warm in the little baby crockpots, all snuggled in a row.  Well, after 2 years of storing a family of tiny crockpots still in their original packaging in my cabinet, I have finally come up with a daily use for them – making oatmeal!

My husband leaves for work pretty early and I always want to send him off with a warm breakfast (especially during the winter when it gets down below 70 degrees here in Honolulu at night – freezing!) but there’s no way that this pregnant lady with a toddler is going to get up early enough to make something fresh for my hard working honey.  He really loves oatmeal and it’s actually quite a healthy and filling breakfast if it’s prepared properly by soaking before cooking to reduce levels of phytic acid (a nutrient blocker that makes grain difficult to digest).  Here’s what I do:

  • Place 1/4 to 1/2 cup of oats in the crockpot and add twice as much water.  I like to use steel cut Irish oatmeal but just get whatever you can find at the store that seems the least processed.  If you are a gluten-free person make sure the oats are labeled as “gluten free” because many times, oats and gluten-containing grains are processed on the same equipment so there is cross-contamination.    Gauge how much you soak based on how much cooked oatmeal you want – using 1/4 cup of oats will expand to about a cup cooked, and 1/2 cup will expand to about 2 cups.  If you have time, let this soak for a few hours.  I like to put this on before I make dinner since I’m in the kitchen anyway.  Once in a while I don’t have time for this step so I skip right to the next one and my husband seems to survive okay!
  • After the initial soak, dump out this water and then add about 3 parts of water to 1 part of soaked oats.  You can also add a dash of buttermilk or whey if you have it to help make the oats even more digestible.  I add a pinch of Celtic salt at this stage to increase the mineral content, and a dash of cinnamon so the kitchen smells warm and comforting when my husband wakes up to eat.
  • Plug in your tiny crockpot and let cook overnight!
  • In the morning, mix with any toppings that make you happy to be awake: butter from grassfed cows, coconut milk, minimally processed cow’s milk or cream, chopped raw nuts, raisins, dried cranberries, raw honey, shredded unsweetened coconut, chopped dates, apple sauce, protein powder – whatever your heart desires.  If you’re more of a savory person, you can also mix an egg and some bacon or sausage in for a salty pudding reminiscent of a big hairy Irish man.
  • Fill crockpot with water to soak so it’s easy to clean up and use for the next day, unless you’re like me and have several tiny crockpots that can be switched out so there’s no hurry to clean up the used one and it can just sit on the counter taking up space and waiting to be washed.  Not that I ever do that.

If any of you readers out there have uses for tiny crockpots (other than cheese dip, I figured that one out already) please share them in the comments section!  I love finding new and exciting uses for all my kitchen gadgets.

December 7, 2011   2 Comments

The Health Benefits of Capers

Nothing says “I’m better than you” like cooking with capers.  Most people either love or hate the flavor of those salty little green pellets, but no matter what, if you serve them at a dinner party and someone complains about it you can very aristocratically say “That’s okay, not everyone has refined enough tastes to enjoy the delicate nuances of capers” while gracefully adjusting your tiara.  This is especially helpful when the dinner party consists only of you, your  husband (who does not appreciate capers, by the way), and your toddler.  Here are just a few of the health benefits to justify cooking like a princess:

  • Stachydrine, a phytochemical found in capers, has been found to be a “potent anti-metastatic agent” in regards to prostate cancer and seems to work at the genetic level to keep prostate cancer cells from reproducing.  So you are actually cooking with capers to keep all the prostates at the dinner table healthy!
  • Bioflavonoids from capers have been found to inhibit NF-kappa B activation.  Who cares?  Even if you don’t, the drug companies do.  NF-kappa B is a major target for drug research because this factor has been found to be chronically activated in disease states such as cancer, arthritis, asthma, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and even acne.
  • Extracts from caper plants have been found to lower blood pressure by relaxing blood vessels.  Of course, if your hypertension is due to salt sensitivity then eating salty capers by the bucketful is probably not the best option.
  • The anti-arthritic components in capers seem to be most concentrated when extracted into alcohol.  This justifies cooking any sort of protein (fish, chicken, lobster) in a white wine, butter, and caper sauce!
  • Capers are a rich source of rutin, a bioflavonoid that is sometimes taken in supplement form to prevent and treat varicose veins.
  • Capers have been found to have “important antimicrobial, anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antiviral properties“.  This study firmly proves that if I left anything out in my list above, you can use the 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon game (health version of course) to relate whatever ailment your dinner guest may have to something that capers can help with.

December 5, 2011   1 Comment

Low-Allergy Baby Formula Recipe

This week I received several requests from friends with babies asking for help finding something to supplement their breastmilk supply, which may have decreased since they returned to work or may not be enough to keep up with their babies’ growing needs.  The priority for these mothers and for me is to help them get their supply up by making that they are drinking enough water, eating enough healthy fat, and using herbal teas or tinctures to promote milk supply.  In addition to this, they may want to take their baby in for an osteopathic or chiropractic evaluation to see if any cranial work needs to be done to improve the sucking reflex – I actually had a miraculous experience with this recently that I hope to blog about in the future.  If after these two measures there still is a need for a supplemental source of nutrition, I would recommend the recipe below.  I created this by looking into the chemical composition of human breast milk on the USDA nutrition website.  Interesting reading!  From there, I put together a list of ingredients to mimic the composition of breast milk as closely as possible while using healthy, low allergy, and easily obtainable ingredients.  I also added an infant probiotic to supply healthy bacteria, one of the most important things a nursing child gets from its mother.  The base for the formula is coconut milk, which is very low allergy and supplies brain-boosting fats as well as lauric acid, a fatty acid found in breastmilk that protects against infection, especially from viruses.  This is by no means a recipe that should be a child’s sole source of nutrition, but it makes a great supplement to babies who are breastfeeding or on formula and also to toddlers in place of other milks.  If you are a parent looking for formula recipes that can safely supply everything your baby needs (but that are a little more complicated to make), I suggest visiting the Weston Price Foundation’s formula recipes web page.  Here is the recipe, I would love any feedback from parents out there who try it!  Some of the ingredients in it are practitioner-only supplements so if you have a hard time finding them, feel free to contact me and I can help you find a practitioner in your area or if you are a client of mine I can just have it drop shipped to you.

Low-Allergy Baby Formula Recipe

In a sterile quart-sized Mason glass jar, combine the following:

  • 1 cup full-fat canned coconut milk, preferably Native Forest brand (they don’t use BPA in can lining)
  • 1 heaping Tbsp unsweetened, unflavored whey protein Dairy free babies can use an equal amount of unflavored rice protein or pea protein
  • 5 Tbsp. Lactose A note about lactose: Lactose is the primary form of sugar in breastmilk and it has special nourishing qualities for the brain and the healthy bacteria in the gut.  Lactose also has the benefit of being one of the least likely sugars to promote tooth decay.  Many babies who are allergic to cow’s milk formulas can still handle pure lactose as long as their gut bacteria is healthy because the most allergenic item for a baby in cow’s milk is the casein protein.  I know 5 Tbsp seems like a lot!  But if you’ve ever tasted breastmilk you’d know it tastes like melted ice cream :).  For toddlers this amount can be decreased to 3 Tbsp.  Parents of babies who are truly lactose intolerant can use 4 Tbsp of Grade B maple syrup instead to supply the carbohydrate content – this is a much better choice than the white sugar and corn syrup used in many dairy-free infant formulas.
  • 1 tsp Standard Process Calcium Lactate Powder (preferred) or 1/2 tsp KAL brand Dolomite Powder
  • Contents of 2 capsules Allergy Research Group Dessicated Liver from grassfed cows
  • 2 tsp Udo’s Infant Probiotic powder
  • 2 tsp liquid Cod Liver Oil, either Nordic Naturals or Carlson or 1 tsp Green Pastures Brand
  • 1 large egg yolk (for children over 4 months only) from a healthy chicken that has been raised on pasture.  This supplies cholesterol, arachidonic acid, and other nutrients that are extremely important for brain growth.  I boil the egg for 3 1/2 minutes (just long enough to harden the white but not the yolk) then peel, and release just the yolk into the formula.  This is optional and can be omitted for egg-free babies as long as they are getting healthy cholesterol somewhere else, such as in grassfed butter or meat.
  • Distilled or Reverse Osmosis water to 4 cups

Shake to combine (using one of those springs that comes with protein powder shakers
can be really helpful).  Will keep in fridge for up to 48 hours.  Formula will separate, so shake before pouring into bottle or cup and gently warm to drinking temperature in a warm water bath or bottle warmer.

 

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: This recipe is intended to supplement a nursing or formula-fed child’s diet.  It is not intended to be a complete replacement.  This blog does not replace the advice of a qualified healthcare practitioner.  Jessica Stamm assumes no responsibility for the reader’s interpretation of the contents of her blog.

September 9, 2011   27 Comments